Over the last century, the dangers of working in industry and manufacturing were demonstrated by the countless numbers of severe injuries and fatalities that commonly occurred on the production floor.

Fortunately, with the establishment in 1971 of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and through better standards and efforts of employers, today’s work force experiences greatly reduced risks associated with accidents in the workplace.

In January 2015, OSHA implemented a more stringent rule on reporting, requiring employers to report workplace fatalities and injuries to the agency within 8 hours and 24 hours, respectively.

According to businessinsurance.com, employers reported more than 10,000 severe injuries in the first year of the revised reporting rule. Of all injuries reported since then, nearly 1 out of 3 are to the hand, with a loss of a finger being the most common type. Most at risk were those responsible for the use and care of stationary machinery such as saws, presses, conveyors and bending, rolling, or shaping machines.

Loss of a finger is a real risk without proper guarding or use of safety chains

While not all finger amputations occur strictly with conveyor use, pinch points do exist that can be easily accessed if not properly guarded on chain top and tabletop conveyors, particularly in curved sections.

Chain selection and proper guarding through curves – or wherever cross members within the framework can create pinch points as the chain passes over. Therefore, it is critical that care is exercised in design and installation.

More and more conveyor manufacturers are creating safety chains to reduce the pinch points, making conveyors considerably safer.

At Dorner Manufacturing Corporation – provider of conveyance automation solutions since 1966, safety is a number one priority with all of their conveyor systems. Dorner Engineers are committed to providing the customer with the safest design possible. They offer a series of safety chains for their conveyors, including both plain Acetyl and chains with friction inserts.

To learn if your conveyance system meets the highest standard of safety, contact the Conveyor Specialist at BRAAS Company.

Helpful links:

Safeguarding Equipment and Protecting Employees from Amputations